Are You FLSA Compliant in Your State?

by Lyle Leritz, Ph.D. 30. March 2018 10:13
In 2016, the Department of Labor published its final rule regarding changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) which dictates federal overtime wage laws. Of note was a significant change to the minimum salary threshold required to classify an employee as exempt from overtime laws. However, a United States District judge imposed an injunction that stopped the rule's enforcement from going into effect, and, as of 2018, there do not appear to be any efforts to revive the proposed changes. [More]

U.S. Salary Increase Budgets Expected to Rise

by Linda Cox 13. February 2018 08:37
Given recent economic trends, the reasons to justify raising U.S. salary increase budgets over 3% in 2019 are increasing. [More]

Tax Reform Hits Compensation of Nonprofit Executives in 2018

by Linda M. Lampkin, Senior Nonprofit Compensation Specialist 24. January 2018 12:21
Effective January 1, 2018, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, otherwise known as the Tax Reform bill, imposes a new 21% excise tax on nonprofits that pay compensation of $1 million or more to any of their five highest-paid employees. There will also be a tax on certain employee benefits. [More]

How Many Charity CEOs Will Earn $1 Million or More in 2018?

by Linda M. Lampkin, Senior Nonprofit Compensation Specialist 27. December 2017 12:26
A Wall Street Journal study published in March 2017 found that around 2,700 employees of 501(c)(3) nonprofits received annual compensation of more than $1 million in 2014. In 2011, a similar study found that about 2,000 were paid at this salary level, so the number increased about 30% over the three years. The number of employees receiving compensation in excess of $1 million will probably increase significantly in 2018. [More]

FLSA Overtime Law Uncertainty

by Lyle Leritz, Ph.D. 26. September 2017 10:06
The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) was introduced in 1938 with the objective to improve labor conditions, protect underage employees, provide a minimum wage, and allow for overtime pay. Several amendments to the FLSA occurred over the years, with a significant change in 1963 with the Equal Pay Act. This amendment required employers to pay men and women the same wage for jobs that required equal skill, effort, and responsibility and were performed under similar working conditions. Legitimate pay practices like seniority, merit-based programs, or systems that tied earnings to quantity or quality still allowed for unequal pay. Over the next 41 years, the FLSA was amended to increase minimum wages (multiple amendments), provide protections for specific types of workers (e.g., migrant and seasonal workers, etc.), and other relatively small changes. [More]

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