FLSA Overtime Law Uncertainty

by Lyle Leritz, Ph.D. 26. September 2017 10:06
The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) was introduced in 1938 with the objective to improve labor conditions, protect underage employees, provide a minimum wage, and allow for overtime pay. Several amendments to the FLSA occurred over the years, with a significant change in 1963 with the Equal Pay Act. This amendment required employers to pay men and women the same wage for jobs that required equal skill, effort, and responsibility and were performed under similar working conditions. Legitimate pay practices like seniority, merit-based programs, or systems that tied earnings to quantity or quality still allowed for unequal pay. Over the next 41 years, the FLSA was amended to increase minimum wages (multiple amendments), provide protections for specific types of workers (e.g., migrant and seasonal workers, etc.), and other relatively small changes. [More]

Attracting Nonprofit Executives in a Tight Labor Market

by Linda M. Lampkin, Senior Nonprofit Compensation Specialist 12. September 2017 07:52
With the US unemployment rate at a little over 4%, considered "full employment" by some economists, there is increasing competition between the nonprofit and for-profit sectors for employees. The for-profit companies are also being much more aggressive about promoting the social aspect of employment as a recruiting technique. Employees seeking a mission, the traditional nonprofit talent pool for nonprofits, can now find jobs in for-profit companies that may offer what they want – some paid hours for volunteering, a company commitment to a cause, etc. [More]

Nonprofit Executive Compensation: How Much Is Too Much?

by Linda M. Lampkin, Senior Nonprofit Compensation Specialist 27. July 2017 10:10
An investigative report about the Goodwill Industries affiliate in Omaha in a local paper started by looking at high compensation levels for the Omaha executives, but then continued to look at the payment of hourly rates for disabled workers less than the minimum wage. Then the issues of conflict of interest between board and staff, nepotism, and even the repackaging of foreign-made goods sold under “Made in America” labels were revealed. As community support waned, there was serious discussion of withdrawing the county-granted organizational exemption from property tax. [More]

Boards Need to Get Nonprofit Executive Compensation Right

by Linda M. Lampkin, Senior Nonprofit Compensation Specialist 3. February 2017 13:49
Boards of nonprofits are tasked with setting compensation for their executives, and there are some compelling reasons to do it right. [More]

What Matters in Setting Nonprofit Executive Compensation

by Linda M. Lampkin, Senior Nonprofit Compensation Specialist 10. January 2017 10:34
Boards setting nonprofit CEO compensation have a lot to consider – they need to set salaries that attract and retain the leaders needed by the charity and also fulfill their fiduciary responsibilities to allocate the charity money wisely. At the same time, they must be compliant with IRS regulations on “reasonable compensation” (and perhaps state regulations) with an awareness of the potential for public scrutiny. [More]