FLSA Overtime Law Uncertainty

by Lyle Leritz, Ph.D. 26. September 2017 10:06
The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) was introduced in 1938 with the objective to improve labor conditions, protect underage employees, provide a minimum wage, and allow for overtime pay. Several amendments to the FLSA occurred over the years, with a significant change in 1963 with the Equal Pay Act. This amendment required employers to pay men and women the same wage for jobs that required equal skill, effort, and responsibility and were performed under similar working conditions. Legitimate pay practices like seniority, merit-based programs, or systems that tied earnings to quantity or quality still allowed for unequal pay. Over the next 41 years, the FLSA was amended to increase minimum wages (multiple amendments), provide protections for specific types of workers (e.g., migrant and seasonal workers, etc.), and other relatively small changes. [More]

Attracting Nonprofit Executives in a Tight Labor Market

by Linda M. Lampkin, Senior Nonprofit Compensation Specialist 12. September 2017 07:52
With the US unemployment rate at a little over 4%, considered "full employment" by some economists, there is increasing competition between the nonprofit and for-profit sectors for employees. The for-profit companies are also being much more aggressive about promoting the social aspect of employment as a recruiting technique. Employees seeking a mission, the traditional nonprofit talent pool for nonprofits, can now find jobs in for-profit companies that may offer what they want – some paid hours for volunteering, a company commitment to a cause, etc. [More]